Four out of the top-5 reasons to not purchase an EV are range and charging related, study

According to Simon-Kucher & Partners’ Automotive Global Consumer Survey, 4 out of the top-5 reasons to not purchase an EV are range and charging related. The survey inquired almost 10,000 car customers from across 14 countries about their product and purchase preferences, and attitudes towards new mobility concepts. The survey also concluded that 87% of customers purchased an electric vehicle from dealerships and only 7% from online retailers.

While a key trend globally has been the increasing acceptance of EVs (Electric Vehicles), driven by sustainability concerns and fears of increasing regulatory restrictions on conventional vehicles, 90 percent of U.S. respondents currently drive gasoline or diesel-powered vehicles and will consider a gas-powered vehicle for a new-car purchase.

Price, range, and charging infrastructure were the key reasons given by respondents for not considering an EV. On average, respondents expect a driving range of over 343 miles (552 km).

It is clear to us that the future of the automotive industry is electric, but consumer sentiment indicates that this transition will be measured, dependent upon (among other factors) the proliferation of supporting infrastructure and the advancement of battery technology.

Dylan Grien, Manager at Simon-Kucher,

Autonomous driving technology gaining traction

Reactions to autonomous driving technology remain mixed. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated excitement about the technology, while 32 percent admitted fear of autonomous technology. System malfunctions, failure to react to human behavior, and the possibility of the car being hacked or externally controlled were the top concerns.

Though the overall view is that autonomous technology is a positive move technologically and will become standard in the coming years, most respondents strongly perceived autonomous vehicles as a luxury and believe they will be too expensive.

Will Lee, Senior Manager at Simon-Kucher, commented:

“Consumer acceptance of fully autonomous driving technology will depend on building their inherent trust in the vehicle itself. Building this trust will require a crawl, walk, run strategy. Consumers must first feel comfortable with advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) such as automatic emergency braking and adaptive cruise control, which are becoming more common in new vehicles. Consumers who already have ADAS will be more likely to accept the next phase, which is partial autonomous driving technology such as hands-free highway driving assist. These consumers will then have a clearer path to accepting fully autonomous driving technology.”

The Automotive Consumer Survey (Global) was conducted by Simon-Kucher & Partners in October 2021. Almost 10,000 car customers from across 14 countries (Australia, Belgium, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Norway, Spain, Sweden, UK, and US) were surveyed about their product and purchase preferences, and attitudes towards new mobility concepts.